A/Prof. Chris Hamer, Global Challenges Foundation working group coordinator

Ideas can change the world. However, for them to do so, a process is required: those ideas must establish themselves in the minds of people who start believing in them, as new value systems and new narratives. They must become proper implementable models, policy frameworks, institutional blueprints. This process, whereby bold ideas are made concrete in order to gain impact, marks a new phase in the journey of the Global Challenges Foundation.

The New Shape Process brings together five working groups, yielding concrete proposals to reform global governance that were presented at the November 2018 Paris Peace Forum. …


Augusto Lopez-Claros, Global Challenges Foundation working group coordinator

Ideas can change the world. However, for them to do so, a process is required: those ideas must establish themselves in the minds of people who start believing in them, as new value systems and new narratives. They must become proper implementable models, policy frameworks, institutional blueprints. This process, whereby bold ideas are made concrete in order to gain impact, marks a new phase in the journey of the Global Challenges Foundation.

The New Shape Process brings together five working groups, yielding concrete proposals to reform global governance that were presented at the November 2018 Paris Peace Forum. …


Natalie Samarasinghe, Global Challenges Foundation working group coordinator

Ideas can change the world. However, for them to do so, a process is required: those ideas must establish themselves in the minds of people who start believing in them, as new value systems and new narratives. They must become proper implementable models, policy frameworks, institutional blueprints. This process, whereby bold ideas are made concrete in order to gain impact, marks a new phase in the journey of the Global Challenges Foundation.

The New Shape Process brings together five working groups, yielding concrete proposals to reform global governance that were presented at the November 2018 Paris Peace Forum. …


Dr. Paulo Magalhães, Global Challenges Foundation working group coordinator

Ideas can change the world. However, for them to do so, a process is required: those ideas must establish themselves in the minds of people who start believing in them, as new value systems and new narratives. They must become proper implementable models, policy frameworks, institutional blueprints. This process, whereby bold ideas are made concrete in order to gain impact, marks a new phase in the journey of the Global Challenges Foundation.

The New Shape Process brings together five working groups, yielding concrete proposals to reform global governance that were presented at the November 2018 Paris Peace Forum. …


Dr. Shahr-Yar Sharei, Global Challenges Foundation working group coordinator

Ideas can change the world. However, for them to do so, a process is required: those ideas must establish themselves in the minds of people who start believing in them, as new value systems and new narratives. They must become proper implementable models, policy frameworks, institutional blueprints. This process, whereby bold ideas are made concrete in order to gain impact, marks a new phase in the journey of the Global Challenges Foundation.

The New Shape Process brings together five working groups, yielding concrete proposals to reform global governance that were presented at the November 2018 Paris Peace Forum. …


Jeffrey Ding, Future of Humanity Institute, Oxford University

The views expressed in this article are those of the authors. Their statements are not necessarily endorsed by the affiliated organisations or the Global Challenges Foundation.

Fears of a U.S.-China AI arms race have proliferated in the past year, with leading thinkers highlighting AI as a technology that could provide a decisive strategic advantage for the country best equipped to harness its potential. These fears intensified after China announced its intentions to become the world’s “primary” AI innovation center by 2030 in a far-reaching AI development plan (AIDP). While it is important to understand how China’s pursuit of AI could…


Siim Sikkut, Government Chief Information Officer, Republic of Estonia

The views expressed in this article are those of the authors. Their statements are not necessarily endorsed by the affiliated organisations or the Global Challenges Foundation.

Over the last 20 years, Estonia transformed into one of the most digital countries in the world. What could our global governance institutions learn from this experience? The three pillars of ‘e-Estonia’ have been the development of a strong digital identity, interoperability systems, and a decisive embrace of change. These could offer promising pathways for more effective global governance systems.

The government of Estonia has been employing information and communications technology to the best…


Kok Yam Tan, Deputy Secretary (Smart Nation and Digital Government), Singapore Prime Minister Office

The views expressed in this article are those of the authors. Their statements are not necessarily endorsed by the affiliated organisations or the Global Challenges Foundation.

Artificial intelligence based on machine learning could revolutionize the very core of the governance process. It could overcome the biases and limitations of the human mind, and offer a radically new way to address highly complex problems such as climate change. How can governments and global institutions learn to deploy such capabilities? Cities offer a good testing ground, and Singapore has made some early inroads. …


Jennifer Doudna, Professor, Departments of Chemistry & Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley; Samuel Sternberg, Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University

The views expressed in this article are those of the authors. Their statements are not necessarily endorsed by the affiliated organisations or the Global Challenges Foundation.

CRISPR technology now places the power to easily rewrite the genetic code of living organisms — including humans — into the hands of scientists worldwide. What type of oversight is required for this technology to deliver on its immense potential to improve the human condition? …


Liu Cixin, science fiction writer, author of The Three Body Problem

The views expressed in this article are those of the authors. Their statements are not necessarily endorsed by the affiliated organisations or the Global Challenges Foundation.

Science fiction has been an important vehicle for anticipating technological developments. When imagining the future of global governance in his world-acclaimed best-seller The Three Body Problem, what did Liu Cixin, China’s most prominent sci-fi writer, take into consideration? With information technology making the world smaller, global cooperation is becoming increasingly important — particularly as the development path of rising nations may conflict with the values of the dominant west. …

Global Challenges Foundation

We work to incite deeper understanding of the global risks that threaten humanity and catalyze ideas to tackle them by reforming global governance.

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